Posts Tagged ‘Lord of the Rings’

Mordor Uruk Hai

Here are my finished Mordor Uruk Hai. These were fun models to paint and I kept to a very limited palette of dark browns and greys to match their appearance in the films as closely as possible. The tricky thing about painting them was to keep them very dark but without them ending up looking like black blobs. Hopefully the different areas look distinct enough while still having the desired overall effect of dark, dirty orcs.

The Uruk Hai were painted using the same techniques I used on Shagrat. However, one problem I ran into was the fact that Scorched Brown has been discontinued. Although Citadel’s Rhinox Hide is the new alternative the paints are not quote the same. When painted on neat the colours look similar enough but the pigments used in them are different, something which becomes very apparent when mixing the paints with lighter colours for highlights. Scorched Brown had a red tint to it which Rhinox Hide lacks. In order to solve this problem I mixed Rhinox Hide with Dark Flesh for the brown leather armour and highlighted this by adding Kommando Khaki to the mix. This has produced very similar results.

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I’ve also painted up a couple of Mordor orcs. Together with the Uruk Hai this adds a nice 100 points to my Mordor collection. I don’t know why that is important as I haven’t played a game in ages but it is a nice neat number.

Mordor Orcs

 

Mordor Orc

Mordor Orc

Mordor Uruk Hai

Just a quick update to share some Mordor uruk hai that I am currently working on. As you can see, they are all in various stages of painting. In the background are some Men of Gondor who I have also started.

And here are some other projects I have on the go as well. I never seem to be able to stick to one thing for long. Is anyone else a ‘hobby butterfly’?

Work in Progress

LotR Army of the Dead

“The Dead are following,” said Legolas. “I see shapes of men and of horses, and pale banners like shreds of cloud, and spears like winter thickets on a misty night. The Dead are following”.

Here are my ‘Army of the Dead’ models from The Return of the King. I’ve had these models since their original release so it’s about time I got some paint on them. The painting process was extremely fast, making these the quickest models I have ever painted. In fact, the drying time was considerably longer than the amount of time I actually spent with a paintbrush in hand. In real life they are a tad greener than in the pictures and closer to how they appear in the film.

My method was as follows:

1) Prime the models black.

2) Spray the models lightly with Skull White. The trick here is to leave the recessed areas black.

3) Wash the model with Nihilakh Oxide. You will probably need two washes to build up the colour (make sure wait until the first is completely dry before applying the second).

4) Lightly drybrush the model white. That’s it!

As you can see, this is a really quick method. These models are not going to win any competitions but the results are very pleasing considering the amount of time spent on them and they will look great on the tabletop.

LotR Army of the Dead

Currently painting some old LotR models and experimenting with Nihilakh Oxide.

Host of Mordor

For a little space you may triumph on the field, for a day. But against the Power that now arises there is no victory. [...] The West has failed. It is time for all to depart who would not be slaves.

Recently I have been revisiting my Mordor collection, once more buoyed up on my enthusiasm for all things Tolkien. A number of these models were already painted but have been rebased in order to better fit in with my collection. I was never all that happy with the grey, dusty bases so I redid them as verdant fields representing Gondor or Rohan. A few new orcs have been added including a drummer and a standard bearer along with a Mordor Troll (which I have finally got around to finishing after a few years of it sitting around on my ‘work-in-progress’ shelf*).

*or, more accurately, my ‘work-has-ground-to-a-halt’ shelf in many instances.

Orcs

All those Quendi who came into the hands of Melkor, ere Utumno was broken, were put there in prison, and by slow arts of cruelty were corrupted and enslaved; and thus did Melkor breed the hideous race of the Orcs in envy and mockery of the Elves, of whom they were afterwards the bitterest foes. [...] And deep in their dark hearts the Orcs loathed the Master whom they served in fear, the maker only of their misery.

The orcs were fun models to paint and each was surprisingly quick. I tried to emulate the dark and dirty look of the orcs in the film but was careful not to go overboard. At this scale too much dirt would make the models look messy and poorly painted. Instead I used a palette of dark, grimy looking colours to achieve the overall effect which, while not identical to the films, works very well at this scale.

Mordor Orcs

The design on the banner was copied from one of the concept sketches in Chris Smith’s The Lord of the Rings: Weapons and Warfare. Although this book is not a great read, it contains a wealth of concept sketches and images of film props which are incredibly helpful when painting models. The design was painted on using Mephiston Red and Shaded by adding Vallejo Black/Red.

Orc Standard Bearer

Orc Taskmaster

Orc Drummer

The taskmaster and the drummer represent two different approaches to painting Lord of the Rings models. The taskmaster is painted to be as close as possible to the film whereas the drummer involves a bit more artistic license. Originally I painted him with pale skin as seen in the film. However, this didn’t look right so I gave him dark skin more akin to an Uruk Hai. Sometimes you just have to go with what looks right rather than total fidelity to the film.

Mordor Troll

There came striding up, roaring like beasts, a great company of hill-trolls out of Gorgoroth. Taller and broader than men they were, and they were clad only in close-fitting mesh of horny scales, or maybe that was their hideous hide; but they bore round bucklers huge and black and weilded heavy hammers in their knotted hands. Reckless they sprang into the pools and waded across, bellowing as they came. Like a storm they broke upon the line of the men of Gondor, and beat upon helm and head, and arm and shield, as smiths hewing the hot bending iron.

The troll was another fun model to paint and a different sort of challenge because of it’s large size. I pretty much followed the ‘Eavy Metal team’s colour scheme which is very similar to the film. I also replicated a lot of colours and techniques used on the orcs to help tie them together as a cohesive force. Overall I’m very pleased with how all of the models look together, they are all different but the shared palette makes them look reasonably unified (well for orcs anyway).

Mordor Troll

Legolas

Legolas from the ‘Breaking of the Fellowship’ set is finished. I have now completed the eight members of the Fellowship who were at Amon Hen. The set also included a Gandalf model depicting him shortly before falling in Moria (his ‘You shall not pass!’ pose) which I will no doubt get around to painting at some point.

He was tall as a young tree, lithe, immensely strong, able swiftly to draw a great war-bow and shoot down a Nazgul, endowed with the tremendous vitality of Elvish bodies, so hard and resistant to hurt that he went only in light shoes over rock or through snow, the most tireless of all the Fellowship.

Legolas gave me the most trouble out of all the models from the Fellowship and I found it difficult to match the green of his tunic to the film (it still isn’t perfect). The tunic was painted Luftwaffe Green, shaded with Athonian Camo Shade and highlighted with Loren Forest followed by Straken Green.

Legolas

The completed members of the Fellowship together:

The Breaking of the Fellowship

I also have a few other projects on the desk which I intend to get on with now that these guys are done. I have my recently purchased ‘Escape from Goblin Town’ boxed set (which I will share with you later in the week) and my Dark Angel army to be getting on with.

All the best,

Andy.

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Gimli

Another member of the Fellowship, Gimli son of Gloin.

Boromir

Boromir is now finished and based. For the leather jerkin I tried to emulate the slightly blueish tint that you see in the films. This was done by highlighting the black with Dark Reaper and Thunderhawk Blue. Not only does this match the films quite closely, but the blue/black is more visually interesting than simply highlighting black with grey. Over all I am very pleased with how Boromir has turned out. This is a great model and one of my favourite poses from the Breaking of the Fellowship set.

There was a tall man with a fair and noble face, dark-haired and grey-eyed, proud and stern of glance. His garments were rich, and his cloak was lined with fur and he had a collar of silver in which a single white stone was set; his locks were shorn about his shoulders. On a baldric he wore a great horn tipped with silver that now was laid upon his knees.

The base, as with all of the other members of the Fellowship, was painted VMC German Camo Medium Brown lightly drybrushed with Bleached Bone. Various flocks, clump foliage and tufts were used to build up the bases. Finally, birch seeds were added to simulate fallen leaves.

Aragorn

Another member of the Fellowship finished, Aragorn.

I am Aragorn son of Arathorn and am called Elessar, the Elfstone, DĂșnadan, the heir of Isildur Elendil’s son of Gondor. Here is the Sword that was Broken and is forged again!

Hopefully I will be finished with this set soon, Boromir and Gimli are nearly finished (they just need basing) and I’ve started work on Legolas.

I’ve also been working on other Tolkien-related models which I will share with you soon (check out my Twitter feed for a sneak peak @Mini_Miscellany).

Until then have a great week,

Andy.

Frodo and Sam

A couple more models from ‘The Breaking of the Fellowship’ set, this time Frodo and Sam. I’ve really enjoyed painting the hobbits. It’s been something of a challenge because of their tiny size but I am very pleased with the results.