Archive for July, 2012

Just a quick update to share my progress on the next ship in the Dreadfleet line-up: the Curse of Zandri. I’m pleased with how this is shaping up. It’s been something of an experiment for me as I’ve used the model to try out some more of the new Citadel Paints and to try my hand at painting a marble effect on the magical statues which you can see in more detail in the photo below.

A while back I mentioned having purchased some new objectives for my Eldar army. Well, I’ve finally managed to get round to painting them. The models are ‘Space Elf Bunkers’ and were sculpted by James Rossillon (aka semajnollissor) from over at the Tactical Command forums. What I really like about these models is the fact that they fit in with the aesthetic of the Eldar army without being direct copies of Games Workshop’s designs.

I don’t believe that the Eldar wage war from fortified positions in the same way that the Imperial Guard do. Instead I imagine that these bunkers form part of a listening post designed to keep tabs on the movements of other races and report back to the Craftworld. In order to add to this feel I slightly converted the ‘Tower Bunker’ by attaching a sensor array to the tower made from part of the backpack of an old Eldar artillery crew model.

Landing Pad Objective

Bunker Objective

Sensor Array Objective

Painting

The Wraithbone structures were painted Dheneb Stone and washed with Devlan Mud to shade them. I then highlighted them by adding increasing amounts of Skull White to Dheneb Stone all the way up to pure white for the final highlights. At this stage they looked rather boring but this is where the fun begins: painting the glass effects.

I really enjoyed painting the gemstones and windows on these models. The gems were painted Scab Red followed by highlights of Red Gore, Blood Red, Blazing Orange and finally Vomit Brown. I’m sure you’ve probably seen articles on painting gems in White Dwarf or on GW’s website but for those who haven’t I’ll briefly explain the process I used here. When painting gems you need to highlight the underside of the gems away from the imagined light source. This produces the effect of the light shining through the object rather than simply bouncing off it (as with an opaque object). Hold a coloured glass bead up to the light and you will see what I mean. The effect was them completed with a dot of Skull White on the top of the gem were the light would strike it followed by a coat of gloss varnish to add a nice sheen.

For the windows I used the same technique, ignoring the window frames at first. This time I started with a base of Regal Blue followed by Ultramarine Blue, Ice Blue and finally Space Wolf Grey. As you can see from the close-up below, I added white reflections to each of the three top window panes that would catch the light rather than just to the top as on the gemstones. I then went back and carefully painted in the window frames with Dheneb Stone before gloss varnishing the glass.

The models then had a mixture of different flocks and clump foliage added to the bases to match my Eldar army.

All the best,

Andy.

Recently I have been working on a couple of different projects. Firstly, I have returned to the Space Wolf which was started some time ago. Initially I was dissatisfied with this model and it sat on my desk untouched because I couldn’t quite work up the motivation to finish it.

However, I have worked out what it was about the model that I wasn’t happy with; the warm yellow colour on the shoulder pads clashed with the cool blue/greys of the rest of the piece. Because of this I decided to go back and repaint the shoulder pads black and add the heraldry of Logan Grimnar’s Great Company (which came from one of GW’s new Space Wolf decals).  I think this decision has really paid off and the whole model looks a lot better for this change.

Applying Decals

I have not always been a fan of using decals on miniatures. There are a number of problems which can occur with them if not applied correctly which can ruin a model. Firstly, the backing material shows up as a faint glossy outline making the decal very obvious and, secondly, they do not always follow the contours of a model and can look creased or uneven. Fortunately there are a couple of tricks which can be employed to combat both problems.

The first trick for successfully applying decals I learned from Imperial Armour Model Masterclass vol 1. Apply a coat of gloss varnish to the surface where you wish to place the decal. This serves two functions: 1) it provides a smooth surface for the decal and prevents the problem of having air bubbles trapped underneath it. 2) it helps to hide the glossy outline of the decal.

Second, Model Scale Industries produce two products specifically designed to help with the applications of decals. These are Micro Sol and Micro Set. These help to soften the decal and make it more malleable so that it fits the contours of a model. Begin by applying a thin layers of Micro Set over where you want the decal to be. Then place the decal on top and slide it into position using a damp brush. You can then use a brush loaded with Micro Sol in order to soften the decal and shape it to the model. You have to be careful when doing this as the Micro Sol actually melts the decal and can make it very fragile and easy to tear.

Once the decal is positioned leave it to dry and then apply a second coat of gloss varnish. This both protects the decal and completes the process of hiding the glossy film around the edge. Once the gloss varnish has dried I dull it down with matt varnish. For this I use a bottle of brush-on Testor’s Dullcote Lacquer, although any matt varnish would do. I prefer the brush-on varnish rather than the spray as it gives you a greater degree control but it’s up to you which kind you use. For the Space Wolf the varnish actually ended up being a little rough looking and so I sanded to down with very fine emery paper (Tamiya’s p2000 finishing paper). Anything too abrasive will simply sand away all your hard work.

 

Epic Orks

I have also been continuing with my Epic ork army. Below is a test model for my Evil Sunz blitz brigade. The red took me a little while to get right as at first it looked a little too flat and I ended up working back and forth lightening and darkening  the red until I was happy with it. Below are roughly the steps I used to achieve the finished look:

1)Basecoat the red areas with Mephiston Red (you may need to use 2-3 thin coats to ensure even coverage).

2) Highlight this Blood Red.

3) I then washed it with Baal Red and shaded the recesses directly with Devlan Mud.

4) Then I layered it up with a several thin coats of Blood Red in order to produce a vibrant red.

5) This was then highlighted with Blazing Orange followed by small edge highlights of Vomit Brown ( a nice yellowy-brown colour, pure yellow would be too bright) on only the most prominent raised areas and sharp corners. Be careful no to overdo it or the whole model will look too orange.

Now that I have the basic method sorted out to my satisfaction I have started work on the rest of the formation. Here is how they currently look:

Tomorrow I’m off to Grasmere for the week in order to do some work with Wordsworth’s manuscripts but when I get back I will try and get these finished.

Have a great week,

Andy.

4

Forever autumn

Posted: July 2, 2012 in Warhammer
Tags: , ,

The blog has been focusing a lot on 6mm models recently so I thought for a change I’d showcase this WFB Wood Elf Lord. For this model I decided to use an autumnal palette of rich browns and orange. As the model is not for gaming I mounted it on a 40mm base which was built up with Milliput (you can see my guide here). With the base I tried to follow the flow of the model which sweeps down from left to right in order not to ruin the composition of the model. One of the things I really like about this model is the fact that it is quite stylised and painterly and the sculptor has clearly put a lot of thought into the pose and composition of the model, from the direction of the cloak and hair through to the position of the bow and quiver and even down to the angle of the branch that he is standing on. This is then all neatly bisected by the angle of the sword which cuts across the model.