Dreadfleet: The Swordfysh

Posted: August 28, 2014 in Dreadfleet, Work-In-Progress
Tags: , , ,

DSCF4127

A quick nautical update with the Swordfysh from Dreadfleet. The main body of the ship is pretty much done now, just the sails to work on.

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Comments
  1. Llama says:

    Looking good! Especially considering the size… I hope you’ll give us an update on the sails later.

    We all know how the GW fanbase treated this game, and how GW refused to put the Dreadfleet-box on sale – but still, I have found a place where they sell these boxes for app. 47 GBP, do you think it is worth it for a normal-earning guy with a slight interest in naval warfare?

    • Andrew King says:

      Thanks, I’m glad you like it.

      Personally I have never understood the hostility that met the game when it was first released. The models are stunning, some of the best plastic models GW had released at the time. They are a bit fiddly and time-consuming to paint (owing to the fact that they need to be painted in lots of sub-assemblies and have lots of tiny details on them) but they look great when finished.

      I am more of a painter than a gamer but the game is fast-paced and fun. Sure it is a little on the random side (a common complain from the game’s detractors) but then so are many games.

      As for whether the set is worth the price or not, I honestly can’t answer that as what you deem to be good value for money depends on a lot of things including your financial situation. I will say that I bought this new from GW and haven’t regretted it. I think as long as you have the time to dedicate to painting the models it is a good purchase.

      It’s just a shame that GW haven’t put out any more of these self-contained games since.

      • Llama says:

        Thanks for your reply, it pretty much sums up what I have been thinking as well. Myself, I like the game WotR (with some slight changes) and that game isn’t played much, for different reasons. LotR: SBG was called a kids-game – just because something isn’t overly compex and “numerical intense” doesn’t mean it is a bad game; this speaks to many of the overly complicated systems from Nottingham, and Britain in general (going against the tradition of Euro-games), where it seems that the person with the best memory [of rules] wins. The best tactician winning is what I like.

        This tradition of rules system not knowing whether they are simulations or games is getting quite tiresome when the players are so adamnt that their system is “realistic” and then continues saying that a “game need some meat on its bones”, meaning the game should have a crappy core system covered with hundreds of extra rules as band aids which in turn are covered by zounds of minutia and “what ifs” making the system perfect for rules lawyers.

        This turned into a rant. TL;DR: As I like the hobby aspect more (see why reasons above), the fiddly bits in Dreadfleet, which you informed me about, are just another +1! The price seems fine by me.

      • Andrew King says:

        I’ve never played War of the Ring but I really like the Strategy Battle Game. I think the rules are fast flowing without all of the “so what does that weapon do again?” (although some of the changes introduced in the Hobbit are cumbersome in this regard).

        One person’s ‘simple’ is another person’s ‘elegant’.

  2. Sam Wise says:

    That’s a very beautiful ship !! and I like the colours !

  3. 40kterminatus says:

    The waves look really well done 🙂

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