Archive for the ‘Random Musings’ Category

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Welcome back. In my previous post I gave my initial impressions of Warhammer: Age of Sigmar from a painting and modelling perspective (spoiler alert: I love it). This post delves into the new background and rules that establish this exciting new age of Warhammer. I should also give a mention to the guys at Tabled Podcast who provide an excellent account of the background to Age of Sigmar which you can listen to here. Their podcast is one of the things that got me so fired up about the game.

A Brave New World

As I said in yesterday’s post, I have been steeped in the lore of the Warhammer World for twenty years now and fondly remember pouring over maps of the Old World in the Warhammer Quest Roleplay book (the first Warhammer Fantasy game I purchased). For this reason I was genuinely sad to see the world destroyed in the End Times. However, the Warhammer World had become static. We all knew what it was and its history and the clock stopped some time around (or just before) the Storm of Chaos. In my opinion, the End Times series was a fitting send-off for the Warhammer World and again I must praise Games Workshop for having the bravery to destroy their setting so thoroughly. Part of me worried that it would turn out to be a marketing ploy like the death of Superman or Knightfall in the ’90s and that after a few months the Warhammer World would be magically restored somehow or that Karl Franz would wake up in the shower and it was all a dream. However, GW have shown no sign of this happening and are instead committed to developing the Mortal Realms.

The new setting, with its diverse opportunities and mythic grandeur, has got me genuinely excited. We know that elves, men and dwarfs have survived but as yet have been told little of their history, territories or social organisation. Personally, I can’t wait for this to be revealed as GW develop their new setting. It finally feels like Warhammer is moving forward again.

The Warhammer World still exists as a ‘historical’ setting for those people who wish to set their games in the ‘World That Was’ (this is even made explicit in the warscrolls on GW’s website).

Stormcast Eternals

Liberator Statue

I couldn’t write a post about Age of Sigmar without mentioning GW’s new poster boys, the Stormcast Eternals. The company’s commitment to these new guardians of humanity is evident from the new statue at GW HQ shown above and these really are the protagonists of the new game.

I really like the background and models for the Stormcast and am eager to learn more about them. The idea of super-human warriors taking the fight to Chaos really appeals to me. At first I was a bit ambivalent about the models but after painting up a few units I have really fallen in love with them. They are fun to paint and, importantly as my gateway army back into Fantasy, look great with a simple colour scheme that is quick to apply. This means I can have an army of them painted up and on the table in next to no time.

Many people have compared them unfavourably to space marines and the moniker ‘Sigmarines’ is already a common pejorative term being used around the internet. However, I like the fact that 40k has started feeding back into Warhammer. Back in the days of Rogue Trader, many fantasy archetypes were ported over into a sci-fi setting and given lasguns and shuriken catapults. It’s nice to see this go in the opposite direction and for an element of warhammer 40,000 to be adapted to a fantasy setting.

The Best Things in Life are Free

Undoubtedly one of the major draws of the game is the fact that all of the rules are free to download. No longer do you need a rulebook, expansions, army books etc to play the game, cutting down the cost of entry. As someone returning to Fantasy after many years I no longer have to worry about which rulebooks are still current or compatible with the latest edition. I can simply download the warscrolls for whatever models I have in my collection and get playing.

Simplicity

Another common complaint. Again, as a painter and collector I really like the idea of not having to trawl through army books adding up the cost of units and picking out combinations of magic items. I know some people got a lot of pleasure from this, and it really is just a matter of personal preference, but as a casual gamer I am all in favour of it.

Conclusion

So there we have it. I can honestly say as a casual gamer who is mainly interested in painting and modelling this release is perfect for me as it does away with a lot of the problems I had getting into Warhammer Fantasy Battle. I understand it may not be everyone’s cup of tea but I for one will be embracing this new age.

Next time I will share my painting progress on the Stormcast Eternals. See you then.

age-of-sigmar

This blog post may seem a little late considering the fact that Warhammer: Age of Sigmar was released a month or so ago and the internet has been awash with these kinds of posts for some time now. However, there are two reasons for this. Firstly, I didn’t want to write an impulsive, reactionary response to the release, instead preferring to wait and see how it developed. Secondly, I was not initially excited about the game’s release but, as more and more information has come to light with each new release, I have become steadily more interested.

I should begin by saying that, although I have been heavily steeped in the lore and history of the Warhammer World for twenty years now, I have not played a game of Warhammer Fantasy Battle or collected an army for it for a number of years. I have always liked the idea of having a Fantasy army, and have even made a few faltering starts over the years, but for some reason I have always found Warhammer 40,000 and the (now sadly departed) Specialist Games range more appealing. However, with Age of Sigmar I have finally taken the plunge back into Fantasy. Over the course of this and the next post I will try and articulate the reasons why.

Base Instincts

As a collector of 40k and Lord of the Rings I am obviously naturally drawn to smooth, inviting round bases rather than harsh, pointy square ones with their nasty angles and so the change to Fantasy on round bases was enough to draw me in. Joking aside though, as someone who is primarily a modeller and painter, I think the move to round bases has really helped shape my opinion of Age of Sigmar. Let me explain.

I know this may be controversial, and many people may not agree with me, but Warhammer always felt to me like a game of pushing around large rectangles (albeit ones with lovingly painted Citadel miniatures on them). I always thought that other scales (such as 10mm as used in Warmaster) were better suited to this style of game.

Another problem with square bases in my eyes is the constraints placed upon the miniature designers who have to consider how the models will rank up when assembled. While models may look great en masse when fully ranked up as a regiment, the individual models themselves tend to end up looking rather similar and lack dynamic poses. The Dark Elf range is a case in point: the new infantry models are well-designed and nicely sculpted but all rather mono-pose. The idea of painting up 20-30 virtually identical models to form a regiment is distinctly unappealing to me. At the opposite end of the scale are cool dynamically posed models that are a pain to rank up.

Age of Sigmar does away with these problems. The seemingly superficial change to round bases and 40k-style unit cohesion frees up designers and hobbyists alike and allows for more varied poses and more dynamic models. While some of the old Warhammer fantasy Battle kits suffer for being on round bases due to their static posing, the new models sculpted with round bases in mind look fantastic.

There’s No Limits

A chief complaint among those who dislike Age of Sigmar has been the lack of points costs, army lists or ‘balance’ (whatever that term might mean when applied to a game that revolves around randomness). For me, this is a sign that Games Workshop have been extremely brave with this release. For years now I have felt that many people have not been playing GW games in the spirit in which they were intended (as narrative-driven, story-telling games) but instead tried to force them into a competitive structure. GW have put their money where their mouth is on this one and done away with points all together. To me this feels like they are returning to their old roleplay roots and giving players a free pass to do what they want with their models.

Furthermore, as someone who is primarily interested in painting and collecting rather than gaming, this lack of restrictions is a blessing. I always felt that having to take x number of these units as a minimum and  y number of those units as a maximum was rather limiting. Now I can paint whatever I want and not have to worry about whether it is a ‘legal’ army or not.

The fact that these restrictions have been lifted at an army level as well (allowing you to field units from more than one faction so long as they fall under the same broad allegiance) allows for even greater freedom and the opportunity to create some great narrative armies. I’m already thinking of adding some Dryads to my Stormcast Eternals as they battle through the Realm of Life or some human refugees made from the Empire militia set. The possibilities are endless.

End of Part 1

These are just a couple of things that have got me excited about Age of Sigmar from a modelling and painting perspective. Join me next time as I run through my thoughts on the new setting and the rules.

Be seeing you.

 

oldhammer_ov_chaos_web

Recently, I have enjoyed reading a number of blogs which focus on what has come to be known online as ‘Oldhammer’. This particular moniker seems to have been around a while now and is generally attached to those blogs with a strong, or even exclusive, interest in early incarnations of Warhammer and Rogue Trader. One thing that struck me about these blogs was that they do not merely engage in warm-hearted nostalgia for the good ol’ days of lead miniatures, polyhedral dice and lengthy random-generation tables (although they do do this) but have a strong focus on the narrative element of Warhammer and Warhammer 40,000 and are witty, mature and eccentric (much like the old GW ranges they cover).

I have added a number of these blogs to the blogroll and would heartily recommend them. Here are my favourites in no particular order.

Oldenhammer in Toronto

Classic Citadel miniatures and the games that use them.

A truly fantastic blog by Oldhammer enthusiast, Matthew Sullivan. The blog is very intelligent and literary and offers amazing insight into the world of third edition Warhammer and other games. Not only that but it show cases some of Matthew’s fabulous collection of vintage models including some great baggage trains. Although I don’t agree with all of his points (I got into Warhammer in the early ’90s and have a fondness for the models from that period), it is great to read a blog by someone with such passion for ’80s miniatures and for wargaming more generally.

The Lead Pile

The adventures of a wargames amateur trying to get stuff painted and the real life that gets in his way.

This is the blog of Whiskey Priest. The main focus of the blog is on pulp sci-fi with a strong emphasis on Rogue Trader.  The blog is well-written and contains a wealth of information on the early days of 40k. A particularly interesting series of articles on this blog covers the myriad influences on the development of early 40k such as Frank Herbert and Isaac Asimov. Well worth a read.

Sho3box

Cramped Combatant Contentment.

The eponymous blog of Sho3box. This is another pulp sci-fi blog which, although maybe not an ‘Oldhammer’ blog in the strictest sense, does feature a range of Rogue Trader and Judge Dredd models. Sho3box really embraces the story-telling aspect of the hobby through the use of small warbands and the Pulp Alley rules. The site features some excellent conversions and paint jobs. Check out his Guardians-of-the-Galaxy-inspired ‘Space Tree People’, a truly creative combination of Dryad and Tyranid parts.

Stro’Knor Macekiller

Oldhammer and Rogue Trader by Quindia Studios.

Another fantastic blog which combines old Citadel miniatures with those from other manufacturers. The blog is full of well-painted, colourful miniatures for both Warhammer and Rogue Trader. As well as focusing on the miniatures, the blog is currently in the process of publishing a chapter-by-chapter review of the original Rogue Trader rulebook which is very entertaining and informative. If you’ve never read this venerable tome or are new to 40k check it out, the author really captures the quirky and eccentric spirit of those early days of the hobby.

Realms of Chaos

Realms of Chaos is the blog of old-school gamer, Nico. This was the first real Oldhammer blog I encountered and I was simply stunned by his fantastic Skaven army which really illustrates how well those old ’80s and early ’90s models stand up today with a decent paint job. His Epic models were also a real inspiration while I was working on my own Epic orks. The blog really captures the intense creativity of those early issues of White Dwarf and is a real feast for the eyes.

Oldhammer Fantasy Battle

This blog by Peter seems to have only recently started up again and has only a small amount of content at present. However, it is worthy of a mention for Peter’s amazing Undead army. These skeleton warriors were the first Citadel miniatures I ever owned and I wish mine had looked as good as these.

April Fools!

Posted: April 1, 2015 in Random Musings
Tags:

Citadel Colouring Book

Citadel Colouring Book

This morning the above image appeared on Tale of Painters. It purports to be a leaked image of the new Citadel Colouring Book and is clearly a light-hearted April Fools joke (you can read the full story here). I particularly liked one comment which read: “GW are also coming out with a giant box of Crayons to go with the coloring book. Every Crayon is an exact color match with GW’s paint line! I can’t wait!!” Obviously written by someone familiar with GW’s advertising rhetoric.

This got me thinking about previous hobby-related April Fools jokes, including a couple from Games Workshop themselves (although sadly there is nothing from them this year).

How to Roll Citadel Dice

How to Roll Citadel Dice

Yes, hot on the heels of publications such as How to Paint Citadel Miniatures and How to Build Wargames Terrain it’s How to Roll Citadel Dice, your indispensable guide to the world of random-number-generating cubes!

Multi-Barrelled Citadel Spray Gun

Multi-Barrelled Spray Gun

Another one from GW, this time a multi-barrelled version of the citadel spray gun which can basecoat, highlight and shade your miniature all in one go.

How to Paint Bilbo Wearing the One Ring

How to Paint Bilbo Wearing the Ring

The Citadel Colouring Book isn’t the first April Fools from the guys over at Tale of Painters, last year Garfy put together this tutorial on painting Bilbo wearing the One Ring. Possibly my favourite hobby April Fool.

*Update*

0110110001

Since penning this article this morning I came across this great April fool by GW’s publishing wing, the Black Library. To celebrate the release of the Skitarii they claim to be releasing their first binary novel. You can even read an extract in binary  here.

Are there any others I’ve missed? Let me know in the comments below.

Andy.

2014 has been a busy year for me as I finished my PGCE and embarked upon a new teaching job which has been very demanding. The bulk of my hobby activity recently has been helping to run the G.A.M.E.S. club in my school with friend and fellow teacher Mr Taylor. It has been really rewarding to see the kids enthusiasm at discovering and exploring this great hobby.

In terms of my own hobby, I did manage to get some time to work on my own models. Here’s a quick recap of 2014 on Miniature Miscellany.

January

January saw the completion of what has definitely been the most popular series of posts on Miniature Miscellany, my Astral Claws Centurions. These were great models to paint and I am really pleased with how each one has turned out; they all have such individuality and character.

Astral Claws Centurions

I also converted a captain for my Astral Claws.

Astral Claws Captain

I also continued with my Dreadfleet set, painting up another three ships. This is a fantastic set and has been a real ‘slow burn’ project for me. The models are fantastically detailed and it has been nice to take my time over them. I tend to paint them up occasionally as breaks between other projects which explains why it has taken so long to get through them.

Dreadfleet

February

In February I painted up some dwarves from the Hobbit using quick and easy techniques (silver spray paint, washes  and drybrushing). I’m really pleased with the results of these simple methods. The dwarves from the film have a great design and these are finely detailed sculpts. It’s just a shame that there isn’t more variety to the range, I’d love some armoured dwarves with shields and spears.

Grim Hammers

March

March saw something of a real highlight for me as one of my models was featured in White Dwarf! A boyhood dream come true.

DSCF3870

April

April saw some retro hobby goodness with this classic model from the Gorkamorka range of the late ’90s. I had planned to paint up more orks and do a write up on how to paint ork skin tones but never quite found the time. Perhaps I’ll get round to this in 2015.

Nazgrub

May

In May I painted up these Dead Men of Dunharrow using quick techniques (spray paint and washes).

LotR Army of the Dead

June

The summer saw some reinforcements for my Astral Claws in the form of a venerable dreadnought and a drop pod. The dreadnought was fantastic fun to paint although I had a few initial problems getting the colour scheme right. The drop pod, on the other hand, was a real paint to put together as it had to be assembled in lots of sub-assemblies and painted in sections. I’m pleased with the finished result though.

Venerable Dreadnought

Astral Claws Drop Pod

July

July saw a variety of orcs/orks in the form of some Lord of the Rings uruk hai and my Battlefleet Gothic ork fleet (still a work-in-progress).

Mordor Uruk Hai

Ork Fleet

Perhaps the most ambitious project for me was working on a fully modeled terrain board. In July I finished the first of the board tiles.

Battlefield

August

August saw some more work on Dreadfleet and some Astral Claws.

The Curse of Zandri

Astral Claws WIP

September

September wasn’t a very productive month hobby-wise as I started my new job. I’m pretty sure I did paint something but no blog posts.

October

In October I started work on Shelob.

Shelob

November

Who was finished in November.

Shelob

December

Which brings us up-to-date with some more Lord of the Rings models and Dreadfleet.

Mordor Orcs

The Mouth of Sauron

Flaming Scimitar

Not bad for a year’s work. There have also been other side projects which have not made it onto the blog but which I hope to bring to you soon including the start of a warband for Inq28 (inspired by the Blanchitsu articles in White Dwarf and a number of fellow bloggers) and the start of my Space Hulk set.

2015

So, what does 2015 hold?

I’m not going to make any hobby plans or resolutions for 2015 as I have seen other bloggers out there do. My free time is very precious at the moment and so I tend to paint what ever I am in the mood for when I do get some hobby time rather than trying to discipline myself and be prescriptive. As I don’t really play games at the moment I am not worried about completing armies for painting up certain units to a deadline. However, I do have a few ideas for  projects I would like to work on.

As I write this I have a Space Marine dreadnought and the Witch King of Angmar primed on my desk and awaiting paint. As mentioned above, I purchased the limited edition Space Hulk set and so I definitely want to get some of those models done. The other day I unearthed three Eldar grav tanks airbrushed red which I would like to finish and which might lead to an Eldar army. I will also continued to work on Dreadfleet. Who knows, perhaps 2015 will be the year in which the set is finally finished. I would also like to continue working on making terrain, an often overlooked but very rewarding part of the hobby.

Hopefully some, if not all, of these projects will make it to the blog over the next twelve months. However, you know how it is with Games Workshop. Their release rate at the moment is incredibly prolific and so no doubt there will be something new and shiny released in 2015 that will grab my attention.

What about you, readers? Do you have any hobby plans for 2015?

 

 

Spring cleaning

Posted: September 2, 2012 in Random Musings

I think at some time or other we all let our hobby spaces get a bit disorganised, particularly if, like me, you don’t have a dedicated hobby area but have one that doubles up for other uses. Over the weekend I managed to build up the motivation to do a bit of tidying and get my hobby materials organised. This should make finding what I need a lot easier and avoid unnecessary rummaging through boxes.

Like many hobbyists, I loathe throwing anything away. I once had a purge of old models and unused components and still regret the loss of certain now hard-to-find components. However, keeping all of those spare sprues certainly takes up a lot of room and so I finally decided to bit the bullet and clip all of my unused components from their frames and store them in ziplock bags. After a while snipping components off frames becomes oddly satisfying and I did manage to reduce the big pile of sprues you see here to the components in the bags. Unfortunately I have only just scratched the surface of this monumental task and I still have two drawers full of frames that need organising.

Now, with all that extra space I don’t have to worry about where to store new models :)

-Andy.

Happy birthday Miniature Miscellany!

Today marks one year since my first blog post. Back when I started this blog I didn’t know how long it would last or if there would be any interest in it. I’d previously started a number of threads on forums to showcase my painting and document my progress with various projects. However, as the projects lost momentum these threads fizzled out. Having my own blog has allowed me to keep everything in one place and to show off whatever I happen to be working on at the time. The name Miniature Miscellany was deliberately chosen with this in mind as I rarely work on one project from start to finish but instead flit between projects and work on whatever models catch my attention. Looking back over the last twelve months there has certainly been a miscellaneous assemblage of models.

One of my biggest achievements since beginning the blog was starting and finishing (well, mostly) a whole army for Epic: Armageddon. I still have a few falcons to paint up and I will probably add to the army in the future but the vast majority of the 3,000 point force is done.

I have also started work on a large Mordheim project which will hopefully include a fully modeled cityscape to fight over and two warbands when it is done. This rather ambitious project has been progressing slowly but is still ongoing. I haven’t abandoned the project but it may be some time before I get back to working on the buildings in earnest as finishing my PhD is taking up rather a lot of my time and so working on smaller, more manageable models is far more convenient for me at the moment.

Another big feature of this blog in recent months has been Dreadfleet. I really love the models for this game as they are very detailed and characterful. So far I have managed to get two ships painted and will continue to slowly work on the rest. Because this is such a nice limited edition release I don’t want to rush through painting them.

Along with these larger projects I have also worked on a number of one-off models which I have tried to paint to my highest standard. My favourite of these has been the Bad Moon Nob in mega armour. I’m very pleased with how this turned out and he has inspired me to move on to building an army of orks for Epic.

Looking back I’ve had quite a productive year for miniature painting. One of the nice things about keeping this blog is it allows me to record what I have done and browsing back over the last year’s posts has made me realise just how much I’ve achieved in a relatively short space of time. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed following my progress on these projects because I’ve certainly had a lot of fun working on them.

Finally, I’d like to say a big thank you to everyone who reads this blog on a regular basis, particularly those of you who have commented or offered encouragement. I’d also like to thank everyone who has added links to MM to their blogs, it really is appreciated.

All the best,

Andy.

Over the weekend I managed to get a couple games of Dreadfleet against Nick and thought I’d share my thoughts on the game. The rules are straightforward and fairly easy to pick up. Our first turn took a while to complete but after that we quickly got used to the turn sequence and order of play. Initially the way in which the winds works was confusing (I’m not sure if it is explained properly in the book or whether we just missed it) but in the end we decided that the rules intended it to blow from the marker on the edge of the seascape towards the centre of the board.

Our set-up for the game

We played through the first scenario in the book, ‘Corpse Reef’, which pits Jaego Wroth and The Heldenhammer against Count Noctilus and The Bloody Reaver. The objective of the scenario is to place 8 damage cards on your opponent’s warship. We set up the terrain following the example to represent the reef of bone that separates the Galleons’ Graveyard from the rest of the ocean.

The games we played were great fun. One of the things I like about Dreadfleet is the fact that the games uses an alternate activation sequence (much like Epic) where one player activates a ship and performs actions and then the other player does the same until every ship has moved. I’ve already written about how I think this style of play is much more fun and challenging than the you-go-I-go turn sequence of other GW games as both players are involved all the time.

In the first game I took charge of the Bloody Reaver and Nick played as the Heldenhammer. As this was the first game we were still getting used to maneuvering the ships and avoiding running aground against the many obstacles that litter Corpse Reef. An early Fate Card resulted in a Ghastly Fog engulfing the board and limiting visibility drastically, meaning that there would not be much shooting in the game. The Heldenhammer managed to trap the Bloody Reaver in the reef and I had no choice but to engage Nick head on. Noctilus managed to kill Wroth in a duel but, despite putting up a good fight (and Wroth’s crew being distracted by sirens), the Bloody Reaver was no match for the Heldenhammer‘s deadly figurehead and was smashed to pieces resulting in a victory for Nick.

Having learned it's lesson in the first game, the Bloody Reaver avoids a head on confrontation with the Heldenhammer

For the second game we swapped sides and I took command of the Empire’s flagship while Nick took the part of the dastardly count. This game was much quicker and smoother than the first as we had a much firmer grasp of the rules. While the first game was dominated by the boarding action that resulted in the destruction of the Bloody Reaver, this game was much more focused on shooting and the early stages saw a lot of maneuvering as we both tried to line up the perfect broadside. This tactical maneuvering is a great element of the game and made things very tense as we each tried to bring our cannons to bear. I managed to pull up alongside the Bloody Reaver but as Nick had issued the ‘Fire as She Bears’ order he got to shoot first claiming first blood. The Heldenhammer‘s magazine store caught fire, seriously damaging the ship. The fires continued to burn and next turn the magazine store exploded, destroying the ship. We decided to ignore this result and played for a few more turns (we didn’t want to end the game so early on). The Bloody Reaver initiated a  boarding action against the Heldenhammer and, with the aid of a Bone Hydra summoned to Noctilus’s aid, managed to overwhelm the crew and claim another victory for Nick.

The Heldenhammer is attacked by one of the many undead denizens of the Galleons' Graveyard

Overall this is a fun, fast-paced game and we managed to get through two battles in an afternoon. The only downside to the game was that some of the Damage Cards are too destructive, particularly in a game where there is only one ship on each side. In the second game the Heldenhammer was destroyed by the effects of a single damage card (which inflicted D3 damage on the ship each turn). For small games in particular I would recommend removing the more destructive cards from the deck. After all, you don’t want the game to be over after a single broadside. Other than this though, we had two very enjoyable games of Dreadfleet and I’m currently working on the Curse of Zandri in preparation for scenario two.

All the best,

Andy.

 

40k on the BBC

Posted: March 13, 2012 in Random Musings
Tags: ,

Is it just me or does Rebekah Brooks look more evil than those Necrons?

The BBC News website has an article on 40k in its magazine section today. It’s quite an interesting and humorous read, particularly the BBC’s concise summaries of the different 40k armies for the uninitiated (‘virtually invincible soulless metal warriors’ and ‘sadistic elfin pirates’ are two examples). Overall the article takes quite a positive approach to the hobby and gives hobbyists the chance to express why they like it. I particularly liked the response to the question of why tabletop wargaming is popular in the age of video games (‘It’s like why theatre remains popular in the age of cinema’ ) and comic-book writer and 40k fan, Kieron Gillen’s comment that: ‘It’s a universe that’s simultaneously nihilistic and joyous. It’s incredibly British in that way.’

It’s nice to see the hobby considered in such a positive way in a mainstream article. Well worth a read.

Well, it’s the end of the year. So what have I got planned for 2012? Next year will bring a lot of big changes to my life. I will be finishing my PhD soon (I’m hoping to submit my thesis around Easter time) and will also be looking for a job. However, I do have a number of hobby plans as well. First of all I have a number of unfinished projects which I am hoping to complete such as my Dreadfleet set and my Mordheim project.

I got a job lot of Mordheim models from ebay recently which included enough undead models for a starting warband. I plan on painting these up for a friend to play with when I start my campaign. Here are the models as they were when I received them. As you can see, they have a very basic paint job which will need stripping and repainting.

Rumors of Chaos

If internet rumors are to be believed, a new Chaos codex is planned for release in 2012. If this is indeed the case expect to see a return to my Death Guard army. My enthusiasm for this project stalled a little as they simply aren’t fun to play with. Hopefully Codex: Chaos Legions will make it possible to play with a fluffy army which is also competitive and fun. I plan on finishing painting my current units and adding a few new models as well. I have my eye on the fantastic  Plague Hulk and Daemon Prince models from Forge World.

An Unexpected Journey

Obviously the big news for next year is the release of the first installment of The Hobbit movies. The first trailer has already been released and looks brilliant. The trailer has been reposted on several blogs so I won’t repeat it here but if you haven’t seen it it is definitely worth a look. It doesn’t really give anything away but it is nice to see Tolkien’s world back on film. As a massive Tolkien-nerd I’m very excited about this and the news that GW will be producing a range of models for the franchise.

Happy New Year!

Andy.