Posts Tagged ‘Battlefleet Gothic’

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Yesterday was certainly an exciting day for fans of the Specialist Games range as GW announced that some old favourites would be returning to our shelves as boxed games and stand-alone products. I had always hoped that GW might go down this route as it did with recent boxed versions of Space Hulk and Dreadfleet (a clear successor to Man ‘O War) and now we have official confirmation that it will happen although we are not sure when.

However, you don’t need to wait months, or even years, for some Specialist Games content; there is plenty of Specialist Games coverage here on Miniature Miscellany in the archive.

A Trip Down Memory Lane

Here are a few of my favourite projects from the old Specialist Games range that I have worked on over the last few years.

My Epic scale orks. I have always loved the old-style orks and these models fit the bill perfectly. They are so characterful despite their tiny size plus the ork range is one of the largest in Epic. The great thing about orks is that they field a collection of rag-tag custom-built vehicles meaning you can easily combine models from different eras and this just adds to the eclectic look of the force. For these guys I went for nice bright colours which help such tiny models stand out on the tabletop.

Epic Bad Moon Orks

Epic Grots

Aeronautica Imperialis Flak Gunz

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I also have a sizable collection of Epic Eldar hailing from the Saim Hann Craftworld. I always intended to paint up an army of their 40K counterparts but the age of many of the Eldar kits put me off and I switched allegiance to their dark kin instead. The Eldar were my first Epic force and I learned a lot about painting such tiny models from these guys.

Epic Aspect Warriors

Epic Farseer and Guardians

DSCF1666 Phantom Titan

Epic Sain Hann Vyper

I also had a real soft-spot for Battlefleet Gothic and this was the one game that I was really disappointed they discontinued. Here is my Imperial Fleet. They represent the Battlefleet Maelstrom defending the Badab region prior to/during the Badab War. If GW ever release some Space Marine ships I intend to add some Astral Claws vessels to the fleet to tie them in more closely with my Space Marine army in 40k.

Imperial Fleet

Imperial Fleet

Firestorm Frigates

Cobra Destroyers

I also have a nascent ork fleet which I painted up this test model for. I went for dirty metallics and red for the orks with bright green as a spot colour on the lights/eyes. I also added a tiny check pattern to add interest and emphasise the size of the ship.

BFG Ork Test Ship

BFG Ork Ship

Finally, Mordheim was one of my favourite of the Specialist Games range and, unlike BFG and Epic which I came to later, I played it extensively when it was first released. Here are some Mordheim characters I painted up a few years ago. Interestingly, this isn’t one of the games mentioned in GW’s press release. Perhaps this is because it is now set in the ‘World-That-Was’ or simply because the models are not radically different the the regular Age of Sigmar range. Maybe it was simply on oversight (I get the impression GW are still undecided on how many or which games will see a come back).

Mordheim Vampire Count

Mordheim Vampire Top

Mordheim Necromancer

Mordheim Mercenary 1

This is just a selection of some of the Specialist Games content on this blog. If this has piqued your interest why not click on some of the tags below for more.

Battlefleet Gothic, Dreadfleet, Epic: Armageddon, Mordheim

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Welcome news indeed!

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The unusual way this news broke, along with some inconsistent-sounding elements such as the fact that this studio would be picking up the LotR/Hobbit franchise, led me to doubt its veracity. However, this seems to be confirmation from an official source that some of the Specialist Games will see the light of day once more (although no comments about LotR). I’m not sure why GW chose to release the information this way rather than making a grand announcement but the return of some classic games is certainly exciting news for the hobby. It seems that this may have been a blunder and GW did not intend the news to go public yet.

Caution does need to be exercised though. At the moment GW are not promising anything more than “new boxed games and stand-alone sets” rather than a fully relaunched product range with continued support. So, all-in-all not too far away from what I predicted earlier.

I don’t normally comment on rumours but this one caught my interest as the Specialist Games range was very close to my heart. In case you haven’t seen it, this is apparently an announcement from Games Workshop that has been doing the rounds on the internet.

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Although I would love to see Games Workshop revisit some of the Specialist Games, I do not believe that this announcement is genuine. Here’s why:

  • The apparent ‘source’ of this information is a store manager in Australia who was told that he could advertise this in his store. This is not the usual channel for GW to release information. Also, why haven’t we heard similar things from other store managers?
  • GW have just released Betrayal at Calth, a huge Heresy-era board game that they are pushing heavily at the moment. Why make an announcement of this magnitude so quietly in the background? Not only will this not receive much notice but, if it were true, it would detract from their current big release.
  • There have been no rumours at all about this up until now. If GW were working on something there would have been leaks. Just look at Betrayal at Calth, images from this ‘top secret’ project were leaked months before release.
  • Similarly, GW haven’t teased this as they did with all other new games.
  • This doesn’t fit GW’s current business model. They already scrapped the idea of a specialist studio to support a small range of games so why go back to it? I could see GW releasing a one-off board game based on a classic game (much like Space Hulk or Dreadfleet) but not them devoting a whole new studio to specialist games.
  • The poster contains a spelling mistake: ‘Armegeddon’. Now, I know there are occasional typos in GW publications (as there in any publications) but to spell the name of a game wrong in the press release? GW wouldn’t be this sloppy about its IP.
  • I don’t buy the idea that this supposed “Specialist Product Design Studio” will support the Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit. From what I’ve heard, the license to produce products for these franchises is coming to an end. Also, the Hobbit was a flop and received little support from GW when it was in the cinema so why revisit it?

What does seem to be the case is that Games Workshop and Forge World have had some kind of internal restructuring and the resulting team is responsible for Betrayal at Calth. This team will be committed to developing further board games in the future. As far as any of the old Specialist Games returning goes, this is very much speculation at this stage. It could happen but this is far from certain.

With all this in mind, I’m going to call this hokum. However, I may be wrong…

BFG Ork Ship

Before painting he whole fleet I decided to paint one model to completion to get the colour scheme right. From the outset I knew I wanted a dirty metallic look to the ships with red details. Once I finished painting all of the ships a metallic colour I decided to use one of the escorts to see how the red looked.

BFG Ork Ship

For the red I used a 50/50 mix of Khorne Red and Mournfang Brown highlighted by adding increasing amounts of Evil Suns Scarlet. I also chose to paint on tiny checks to break up some of the metallic areas and to give a sense of scale. The smaller the checks the bigger the ship looks. Overall I am pleased with the results.

One of the inspirations for the fleet was the following piece of artwork which I found online.

Ork_Terror_Ship_with_Fleet

I decided to try and copy the glowing green eye on my models. For this I used a mix of Dark Angels Green and Putrid Green (an old Citadel paint) and highlighted this Putrid Green followed by Putrid Green and White Scar. This was then washed with thinned Thrakka Green and a tiny white dot was applied in the centre. I am still not totally sold on the effect but the green does add a nice contrast to the red and provides a strong focal point, drawing the eye to the ‘face’ of the ship. I may refine the green glow effect further as I paint the other ships.

BFG Ork Ship

Ork Fleet

I recently decided to start a new fleet for Battlefleet Gothic. I’ve always had a soft spot for Battlefleet Gothic; the miniatures are great and have really stood the test of time. What’s more, I really enjoyed painting my Imperial Fleet and, with a few simple techniques, the models are quick and easy to paint. For my second fleet I settled on Orks as I have always liked the race and I really like the models with their ‘aquatic predator’ look. I also managed to pick up a few ships quite cheaply on ebay (which, coincidentally, work out at exactly 500 points) which was pleasing as a number of BFG ships sell for crazy prices since the game was discontinued.

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One thing that is worth noting about both my Ork and Imperial fleets is the way I have based them. Although I have used the standard GW flying bases I have replaced the fragile stems with lengths of brass rod. This gives the stands increased durability and, although cutting and filing all of that brass rod was a real pain, is definitely worth the effort. As I think BFG stands look better painted black anyway it does not matter that you lose the transparency of the plastic.

If you are going to do this than I suggest you find a thickness of brass rod which fits snugly in the hole in the base of the stand and then use a drill bit to widen the sockets on the ships. Don’t worry if the rod is a bit loose as you can always secure it with a bit of putty.

Battlefleet Gothic Customised Bases

BFG models really benefit from drybrushing and washing which are the main techniques I have employed here. The models were basecoated with a 50/50 mix of Leadbelcher and Tin Bitz. After this they were drybrushed Leadbelcher before being washed with Nuln Oil followed by Agrax Earthshade. A quick drybrush of Necron Compound brought them to the stage you see here. Not bad for an afternoon’s work. Now all I have to do is paint in the details.

BFG Orks  Ork Terror Ship

 

The other day I showed off my finished Imperial cruisers. With the addition of a couple of escort squadrons I now have a finished fleet. I have enough models to field roughly 1,200 points but I plan on slowly adding more ships to my collection in the future.

For those of you wondering what the marks are for on the base, these are in-game aids. The game mechanics of Battlefleet Gothic hinge around the relative positions of ships to one another (moving away, abeam, closing etc) which alter the effectiveness of firepower. The marks should make it easier to tell which arc a ship is in at a glance.

My newly-painted escorts:

The Cobras are white simply to add a bit of variety to the force. They were inspired by the Earth Force ships from Babylon 5 (possibly my favourite TV show of all time). They were airbrushed Fenrisian Grey over a white undercoat before being drybrushed Ceramite White. I’m not normally a fan of drybrushing, preferring layered highlights, but I think the technique works really well on Battlefleet Gothic models and brings out the sculpted details nicely. The basecoat of Fenrisian Grey helps tie them in with the rest of the fleet as this is the final highlight colour on the blue ships. Subtle things like this can make an army look really unified even when individual units are painted in different colour schemes.

The whole fleet assembled and ready for action in the Gothic Sector:

Finally, here is a bit of BFG related humour which I think will appeal to all fans of the 40k universe:

Link

Thanks to Gus for Tweeting me this. I also encourage you to check out his BFG models over on Epic Addiction.

Have a great weekend,

Andy.

I have finished my first four cruisers for Battlefleet Gothic. These were nice, fun models to paint with lots of detail and texture sculpted onto every surface. My only criticism is that there is a little too much texture. It would have been nice to have one or two clear areas in order to add some freehand markings to help differentiate the ships from each other further.

This is my Mars Class Battlecruiser, Righteous Indignation, which will serve as my flagship in smaller games (in larger games I intend to take a battleship as the flagship). The ship features a couple of minor conversions. Firstly, as with all of my ships armed with nova cannons, I filled in the torpedo launch tubes in order to make them wysiwyg (ships are armed with either torpedoes or nova cannons). This isn’t really necessary but it a small detail that satisfies my need for exactness.

Secondly, I converted the bridge in order to make it more impressive and make it stand out from the other cruisers. This was done by adding an Imperial icon from a Space Marine banner pole to the back of the bridge behind the observation dome.

I’ve seen this conversion done before but often the icon simply looks stuck on. I wanted mine to look more integrated into the build of the bridge and so I filed down the back of the bridge and built it up with small pieces of plasticard to support the eagle statue. I then added sensor masts behind the eagle to make it look like an integral part of the bridge structure that was designed to be there. These extra senors can also serve to represent the upgraded targeting systems that you can add to the Mars.

Here is one of my two Lunar Class Cruisers, the main workhorses of the Imperial Fleet. I’m particularly pleased with the glass effect on the observation domes on the ships.

The four cruisers together (sorry for the poor picture):

Painting the Fleet

Here’s how I went about painting the ships.

Blue-grey:

  1. Over a black primer airbrush with The Fang.
  2. Airbrush Russ Grey leaving some of the previous colour showing in the recesses.
  3. Wash with Drakenhof Nightshade.
  4. Drybrush Russ Grey.
  5. Lightly drybrush Fenrisian Grey.
  6. Glaze with Guilliman Blue.

White:

  1. Basecoat Codex Grey.
  2. Highlight Ulthuan Grey.
  3. Highligh Ceramite White.

The details were then picked out with gold and silver as appropriate and the observation domes were painted black and highlighted along the bottom with Codex Grey followed by Fortress Grey (as you would when painting gemstones). I then applied a small dot of white to represent light being reflected from the top before gloss varnishing them.

Now on to the escorts.

Andy.

At the weekend I had a game of Battlefleet Gothic and ended up rolling the ‘Surprise Attack’ scenario which required a number of planetary defences. Unfortunately I didn’t have any suitable models and so we had to make do with some asteroids standing in for defence platforms (we figured they would have small bases with weapons mounted on them). While this worked well enough I decided to build some specific models for future use. After a quick rummage through my bitz box (or rather, boxes) I hit upon the idea 0f using parts from Tau drones as the main platform.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  1. Top part of a Tau drone.
  2. Battlefleet Gothic x4 turrets.
  3. Battlefleet Gothic masts/sensors.

You’ll also need some putty or filler. I also used some half-circle plasticard strips although these aren’t essential.

Step 1

Fill in the recesses on the surface of the drone where the antennae are attached. I used MMD Green Putty for this but it doesn’t really matter what you use. Green stuff or Milliput would work just as well.

Step 2

Drill a hole in the centre of the drone. This is where you will attach it to a flight stand. I mounted mine on a piece of thick brass rod to match my ships (I find plastic flight stands far too flimsy) so I’ve drilled quite a large hole.

Step 3

Glue one of the masts in hole at the centre of the underside of the drone and add the turrets around the outer ring. This will require a little bit of filling to remove some of the details on the drones and the peg on underside of the turrets in order to get them to fit together smoothly.

Step 4

I then added some small pieces of half-circular plasticard rod to give the platforms a bit of extra detail to  break up the flat area around the edge.

So there we have it, a pretty simple yet effective way of making orbital defence platforms.

-Andy.

 

Yesterday afternoon I managed to finish airbrushing the second of my two Battlefleet Gothic boards and added some finishing touches to the first one. This was quite a quick project and I really enjoyed making the boards. It was great fun to try out something a bit different with my airbrush and paint a flat surface rather than a 3D model. However, if I were to do this project again I would probably do things a little differently as I’m not 100% happy with the boards but on the whole the project turned out quite well and has given me a nice surface to play on.

Some more pictures:

 

I’m currently working on a board for Battlefleet Gothic. I’ve played a few games so far and really enjoy the system so I thought it was time to get some terrain together (well, perhaps ‘terrain’ isn’t strictly the right word given that the OED defines terrain as ‘of the earth, terrene, terrestrial’ but lets not get bogged down in pedantry). So far I have painted up a 2’x4′ board to look like a space-scape. Above is a work-in-progress shot of the board which still needs details such as stars added.

What’s really nice about Battlefleet Gothic Terrain is how simple it is to make. The board is MDF which was painted with black acrylic paint using a paint roller. I then airbrushed on a nebula and a galaxy to add some visual interest using astronomy pictures as a reference. The board looks a little more crowded than a real space-scape would be but I’m aiming for visual interest rather than realism.

I also made some asteroids. These were also very simple to do and are simply lava rocks glued to flying stands. I simply copied the technique detailed in Carl Woodrow’s blog post so I won’t go into detail about the process here as it would only be repetition.

Finally, I made a planet. Again, this was very simple. It’s half of a polystyrene sphere purchased from an arts and crafts store. I gave it several coats of fine masonry paint in order to disguise the obvious polystyrene texture before airbrushing it in various shades of brown.

I have a game of BFG scheduled for Sunday so I’m hoping to get the board finished by then. Time to break out the airbrush.

-Andy.